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Climbing Mt St Helens


Mt St Helens view from Silver Star MountainHave you ever thought about climbing Mt St Helens, but you are not sure how to go about doing it? This guide will show you how to do it!

Mt St Helens is a volcano, located in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, in the South-west Washington (south Cascades). It is a very popular climbing destination in the summer, and some people also climb it in the winter.

Attention! In 2015, the climbing permit procedure changed: Now you have to print out your permit after the purchase. You don’t stop to pick it up on the way to the climb anymore.

Introduction

Climbing Mt St Helens in the summer is a very doable endeavor for anyone in decent shape. It doesn’t require any technical skills or expensive equipment. The climb is a one-day hike. Depending on your fitness level, you may have to start the hike early in the morning in order to make it back before dark.

If you plan on climbing in the climbing season, you have to purchase a permit. This article shows you different options obtaining the permit.

Preparing for the climb is very important, not only getting physically fit for the task,  but also wearing and bringing proper clothing, food, water, and other needed gear.

ClimbersBivCamp 300x200Camping at Climbers Bivouac

The Mt St Helens climbing route trail-head is located at the Climbers Bivouac parking lot. It is open now for the 2015 season. To get to the Climbers Bivouac, drive east on Lewis River Highway through the town of Cougar. Cross the canal, and continue straight on Road #90. Turn left on Road #83. After about 3 miles, turn left on Road #81. After about 1.5 miles, turn right on Road 830 (there is a Climbers Bivouac sign there).

The Mt St Helens climb is actually, for the most part, hiking, except stepping and climbing the boulders. These are the distinct parts of the route: The forest trail up to the tree line, the boulders, and the last, steepest and hardest part: hiking in sand and ash.

A collection of links to everything you need to know and want to know about climbing the Mt St Helens volcano